News

N.S.7 at surrender of German Fleet

N.S.7 at surrender of German Fleet

Kindly provided by John Wisdom at two new images of N.S.7 at the surrender of the German Fleet at Rosyth on or around 21 November 1918. N.S.7 was accompanied by N.S.8. The battleship at the head of the column is SMS König Albert – scuttled at Scapa Flow on 21 June 1919. The ship was raised by the British 1935 and was broken up for scrap in 1936. This class of battleship has asymmetrical gun turrets midships – a vital clue to show the correct way these images should be flipped.

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“With the Eyes of the Navy” now online

“With the Eyes of the Navy” now online

The Imperial War Museum has made the 1918 film “With the Eyes of the Navy” available online. Featuring NS7 and NS8 on patrol the film brings to life what life would have been like aboard a North Sea class airship. To view the film visit… IWM

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More images from IWM

More images from IWM

Many more images have been made available online from the Imperial War Museum’s collection. Where copyright allows we have included these in the NS-Class Gallery. 

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Face in the Crowd

Face in the Crowd

One key aim of ours is to put a face to every crew member lost when NS11 came down in flames over the North Sea. Now we have an image of Aircraftman Frederick Cameron…

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New images of N.S.11 come to light

New images of N.S.11 come to light

Recently found in Flickr Commons are eleven photographs that record a significant event in the history of the British airship N.S.11. From March 1919 the images are part of the Adolphe Henri DuBois Special Photo Collection curated by the San Diego Air & Space Museum.

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N.S.11 over Crewe

N.S.11 over Crewe

Photographs, whatever their quality, can often shine a light on new aspects of a story and give substance to a rumour. Did Warneford fly N.S.11 over Crewe to keep a promise to his old workmates? Here’s proof he did.

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N.S.10 being ripped

N.S.10 being ripped

N.S.10 being ripped at Longside on 21 September 1918. Together with N.S.9 and two Coastal Class airships, N.S.10 was recalled because of a rising gale. Wind gusts of 50 mph made landing impossible so all four were ripped at 100ft on the leeward side of the sheds. N.S.10 was never reassembled. The image was kindly provided by John Robertson of the Highland Aviation Museum who received it from Bruce Wells. We would very much appreciate Bruce Wells getting in contact with this site.

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Images of N.S.11 from Pulham

Images of N.S.11 from Pulham

Our visit to the Pennoyer Centre in Pulham St Mary, Norfolk has opened a rich seam of imagery and information to help tell the story of N.S.11 and the North Sea airships.

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New account of N.S.11 record breaking flight

WWI aviation author Michael J Dunn has provided a new account of NS11’s record breaking flight – written by Air Mechanic Redvers Robert Heath, NS11’s 2nd wireless operator. It provides a very different view from that of the commander and gives us a vivid insight into what life would have been like on board during the 100 hours and 50 minutes flight. The account was used in Michael’s article on NS11’s world record flight in the Spring 2012 edition of Cross & Cockade International’s quarterly journal. Heath’s account can seen...

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